Looking back – and looking forward

Something seems to be happening at A Writer of History. Let me explain. Attracting followers is a slow process. For the longest time, you think no one is interested – or maybe that’s just my own insecurity talking. However, during the past year, new followers have emerged at a higher pace than ever before and the number of daily views is also up. Hmmm.

So … I thought new viewers (as well as those of long standing) might be interested in some of the most popular posts from the past. Today I’m sharing posts from 2012 that attracted a lot of attention. I’ll look at other years over the next week or so and perhaps ultimately create a dedicated page for them.

From the World of Historical Fiction – Readers Share Their Perspectives (2012) … a link to the 2012 reader survey.

Historical Fiction Would Be Better If … 588 readers responded with enthusiasm to the question “what detracts from your enjoyment of historical fiction”

Top Historical Fiction Authors – 2012 Survey Results … 602 survey participants provided their favourite historical fiction authors in the 2012 reader survey. Most of those nominated in 2012 were also on the surveys conducted in 2013 and 2015.

Historical Fiction – Four Top Book Blogs … readers selected their favourite historical fiction blogs/sites. Three of the top four from 2012 are all still going strong.

I interviewed owners/bloggers from each top site. Richard Lee’s interview from the Historical Novel Society captured a lot of attention.

Insights from Hit Lit and Author James W. Hall … I read Hit Lit: Cracking the Code of the Twentieth Century’s Biggest Bestsellers looking for insights. This is the first of three posts about the book. More Features of Hit Lit is the second post and Hit Lit – the final six features is the third.

Top Ten Ingredients of Historical Fiction … Having read Hit Lit, I then analyzed interviews with and reviews of top historical fiction authors, looked at articles on the ‘popularity of historical fiction’, and the top three reasons people read historical fiction from the 2012 reader survey. I pulled these together into the top ten ingredients.

As always, I welcome your feedback. In terms of looking forward, I want a new theme for A Writer of History and hope that looking back will help.

FOR MORE ON READING & WRITING HISTORICAL FICTION  FOLLOW A WRITER OF HISTORY (using the widget on the left sidebar)

M.K. Tod writes historical fiction. Her latest novel, TIME AND REGRET was published by Lake Union. Mary’s other novels, LIES TOLD IN SILENCE and UNRAVELLED are available from Amazon, NookKoboGoogle Play and iTunes. She can be contacted on Facebook, Twitter and Goodreads or on her website www.mktod.com.

 

12 thoughts on “Looking back – and looking forward”

  1. Hi there, I am recently new to this site, and really enjoying it so far —the dialogue, the perspectives from both readers and writers, and the helpful advice to authors . I am both a reader and writer . I have written a medieval fantasy novel , and have two other partially completed novels ( mainstream literature). I have also recently completed a novel of Canadian historical fiction which is currently been looked at by publishers . Blood and Snow was a challenging but immensely fulfilling project, and I am contemplating a sequel. I look forward to receiving insights from you, fellow authors, and readers! Best, Judith Hutchinson

    1. Many thanks for your encouragement, Judith. Fingers crossed for your Canadian historical fiction. If you happen to live in Toronto, please let me know. I love meeting other writers!

  2. Excellent idea to recap past blogs of particular value, Mary! I checked out three or four of them.

    Your blog is very enjoyable. Being focused on classical Rome, I’m not so much into WWI events, but appreciate that you’re posting true material about your ancestor.

    Cheers! Sherry

    P.S. I’m already a subscriber.

  3. As an amateur author, and aspiring to improve, I really appreciate the wisdom you share on this blog… for example the post on building fictional characters. I wish I had found that before I wrote my book. I will be sure to use that tool when I create the characters for my next book

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