Twitter Bits

Small bits of wisdom found on Twitter this morning. I’m in a contemplative mood.

I woke beautiful. You woke beautiful. Let’s create beautiful together. @ReeseAdeney

Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle. – Plato

It is not enough to have a good mind; the main thing is to use it well. – Descartes

Unsuccessful people focus on the problems; successful people focus on the solutions.

When you abandon making choices, you enter the vast world of excuses. – Wayne Dyer

The purpose for every experience is to stretch everyone’s capacity for love. @Jenuinehealing

So many people never get anywhere in life because when opportunity knocks, they’re in the backyard looking for 4leaf clovers. – Walter Chrysler

I hope these give you pause for thought in this beautiful season pf peace and joy.

Slow down world, I’m overloaded

Social Media OverloadFour years ago, I began blogging; two years ago, I embraced Facebook; eighteen months ago, I dipped my toe into Twitter and Goodreads. ‘Social media is essential to writers’ I had been told on countless occasions. ‘When I consider representing authors, the first thing I do is check their Facebook pages’ a senior editor said. However, the Globe and Mail’s series, Digital Overload by Erin Anderssen, is causing me to reconsider my approach in today’s world of non-stop interaction.

According to the first two parts of the series:

there is growing scientific evidence that sprinting through the day in a state of super-charged distraction takes a serious toll on our mental and physical health.

Daniel Coleman, author of Focus: the Hidden Driver of Excellence suggests that “we are being pulled away from the things that enrich our lives”, like talking to one another, being intimate, enjoying our children, thinking, being creative. If you need further incentive, Facebook has been linked to depression and a growing email inbox can lead to raised heartbeats and blood pressure.

even simple web searches caused people to take shorter breaths, or hold their breaths entirely, restricting oxygen to their brains.

Being ‘on’ 24/7 is a ‘killer intellectually’. A recent study found that the constant use of social media and email “led to a temporary 10-point drop in the IQ of the study’s participants”.

Nathan Zeldes, co-founder of the Information Overload Research Group has this to day:

The worst damage is to creativity and your ability to think – your mental acuity. Being interrupted and stressed all the time dumbs you down, you make worse decisions, and you are literally less innovative.

Yikes! I need all the IQ and creativity I can muster in order to write successfully.

So what’s the right strategy? I welcome your suggestions and in the interim, I plan to allocate a set amount of time to Facebook, Twitter and Goodreads every day. I plan to turn email off when I’m writing. And I’m going to continue limiting my blog posts to two per week.

There! I feel better already.

PS – I apologize if this post is part of your digital overload 🙂

Favourite reading oriented sites – Readers Choice

M.K. Tod’s 2013 historical fiction survey asked readers to name their “top 3 reading oriented websites, blogs and social media sites”. In other words, where do people go for information and discussion to enhance their reading. The answers are in:

2013 Favourite Online Reading SitesGoodreads is way out in front with 907 mentions followed by Facebook, Amazon, Twitter and Historical Novel Society.

Interestingly, when readers mention Facebook they often qualify their response by mentioning a favourite group, author, fan page or the Facebook page associated with a blog.

Compared with 2012, Twitter has leapt ahead and I am delighted to see the Historical Novel Society featured so strongly.

Over 675 sites were mentioned. That’s an amazing number of sources for readers to peruse!

CONGRATULATIONS TO ALL THE SITES FEATURED

When I have more time, I will attempt to aggregate some of the numbers so I can report on different categories such as small book review blogs, sites dedicated to historical fiction, author blogs, library sites and so on.