The Life of a Blog

Today, I’m looking back at the journey I’ve taken with A Writer of History. And no … this is not the end of A Writer of History. Just an opportunity to contemplate how it has evolved.

It all began early in 2012, when I decided to “push the reset button” and create a new blog to focus on the writing of historical fiction. I’d kept an earlier blog (now defunct) called One Writer’s Voice where I wrote about the business of writing and the notion of being an author entrepreneur. Ultimately, though, I decided to shift gears and create A Writer of History. You can find that first blog post about new beginnings here.

The last seven (!!) years have been a wonderful experience. One that has connected me with many authors, bloggers, and readers, and I’m grateful to all of you who have come along with me on the journey, to those who have contributed thoughts and content, and to those who visit from time to time. I’ve written 817 posts (818 if you include this one). And visitors have grown from 964 in 2012 to over 56,000 in 2018. Never would have imagined that!

At the beginning, I decided to survey those who read fiction with an emphasis on historical fiction. I thought a survey might be useful and I could share the results on A Writer of History. One of the results from that survey was a list of Top Historical Fiction Authors and from there I went on to interview some of those authors including Elizabeth Chadwick, C.W. Gortner, Hilary Mantel, Jacqueline Winspear, Margaret George, Helen Hollick and many others. I also interviewed bloggers who focused on historical fiction included Amy Bruno, Richard Lee,

Because I was writing novels set during WWI, I included many posts exploring my findings – from fashion, to military strategy, to WWI trench standing orders.

At some point, I began to receive book review requests – the first one being The Twelve Rooms of the Nile by Enid Shomer. I was astonished to be asked for a review … imagine, someone ‘out there’ had noticed my little blog. I have to confess that I don’t do many of those anymore given that reading and then reviewing is such a time commitment. Instead, I invite authors to guest post or be interviewed, which also offers a chance to feature something about their latest novel as well as a book cover.

Over the years, various topics have attracted my interest: the role of social media and reading, the life of an author, the excitement of historical research, the daunting challenge of marketing, my self-publishing journey, and the joy of being published. I’ve also included snippets from my own writing and sources of inspiration including my grandparents’ photos and mementos.

I belong to three book clubs and have often posted about our book selections and the lively discussions we have. And for several years now, I’ve posted ‘A Year of Reading’ list with brief thoughts on each novel read that year.

More surveys followed in 2013, 2015, 2017 and 2018. Each survey was an opportunity to discover more about the world of reading and to explore what the findings mean for authors. Although time consuming, the surveys have prompted much interest and I’ve used some of the insights in my own writing and marketing as have others.

My first novel Unravelled was self-published in 2013 followed by Lies Told in Silence in 2014, and then Time and Regret was published by Lake Union in 2016 – I posted about them here and you celebrated with me.

A few years ago, I decided to focus on a themeInside Historical Fiction – to look under the covers of historical fiction and illuminate those attributes that make it different from contemporary fiction. Many writers and readers contributed their thoughts. Another theme was Successful Historical Fiction. Last year’s theme was Transported in Time and Place which began with Dazzled by a Green Door. I’ve written about the purpose of historical fiction and compiled a list from the 2015 survey of favourite historical fiction novels. Another popular series were the WWI letters home from my husband’s great-uncle who served in France and Africa. I tagged these Somewhere in France and Somewhere in Africa.

On the blog you can also find writing tips from well-known authors like Emma Darwin and personal postsWill the Real M.K. Tod Please Stand Up; Grateful for Every Day (a post following the plane crash my husband and I survived), and one on my own #metoo experiences called A Lifelong Feminist.

Much to my delight, in 2016 Writers Digest selected A Writer of History for its list of 101 Best Websites for Writers – and they repeated the honour in 2018. I’m grateful for the acknowledgement of what we’ve built together.

So my friends, it’s been a rewarding journey. You’ve helped me along the way by cheering me on, adding your voice, and contributing your posts. I’ve enjoyed every minute of it and look forward to much more.

FOR MORE ON READING & WRITING HISTORICAL FICTION FOLLOW A WRITER OF HISTORY (using the widget on the left sidebar)

M.K. Tod writes historical fiction. Her latest novel, TIME AND REGRET was published by Lake Union. Mary’s other novels, LIES TOLD IN SILENCE and UNRAVELLED are available from Amazon, NookKoboGoogle Play and iTunes. She can be contacted on Facebook, Twitter and Goodreads or on her website www.mktod.com.

 

 

 

 

A Year of Reading 2018 (Part 2)

Following up on Tuesday’s post – here’s the second half of 2018. If you’ve read any of these, I’d love to hear your impressions.

Here’s the legend: LR = light, enjoyable read; GR = good, several caveats; ER = excellent, few caveats; OR = outstanding; DNF = did not finish; NMT = not my type.

Jul The Splendor Before the Dark (my review) Margaret George OR Superb writing that immerses the reader in time and place.
Resistance Agnes Humbert ER A French woman’s story of WWII resistance and prisoner of war camps
Aug The Beach Club Elin Hilderbrand LR Holiday reading.
I’ll Keep You Safe Peter May LR Holiday reading.
The Winter Crown Elizabeth Chadwick OR Books 2 and 3 of the author’s trilogy on Eleanor of Aquitaine. Highly recommended.
The Autumn Throne Elizabeth Chadwick OR
Sep The Summer Wives Beatriz Williams ER Characters that come alive – a setting that captivates – and a very satisfying ending.
Oct Women of the Dunes Sarah Maine LR Three timelines can be a little confusing.
The Gravity of Birds Tracy Guzeman ER A page turner.
Nov The Clockmaker’s Daughter Kate Morton GR Not as satisfying as her previous novels.
Victoria Daisy Goodwin GR The TV series was more captivating.
Dec The Girls in the Picture Melanie Benjamin GR Two main characters – one is more engaging than the other.
Becoming Mrs. Lewis Patti Callahan ER Loved it.
Edward VIII: An American Life Ted Powell GR Edward VIII’s life, American influences, and his struggle with destiny.

I spent many enjoyable hours reading during 2018 and enjoyed the mix of genres. What were your favourite books from this past year?

FOR MORE ON READING & WRITING HISTORICAL FICTION FOLLOW A WRITER OF HISTORY (using the widget on the left sidebar)

M.K. Tod writes historical fiction. Her latest novel, TIME AND REGRET was published by Lake Union. Mary’s other novels, LIES TOLD IN SILENCE and UNRAVELLED are available from Amazon, NookKoboGoogle Play and iTunes. She can be contacted on Facebook, Twitter and Goodreads or on her website www.mktod.com.

A Year of Reading 2017

First – let me wish everyone the very best for 2018! May it include joy, laughter, purpose, family, friends, and accomplishments both large and small.

During 2017 I read many fascinating books and a few duds. As in previous years, some were for research purposes, others for reviews, and a number for pure pleasure. I hope you’ll find some that suit your reading interests. These represent January to June. Links are to reviews and articles.

Here’s the rating system I’ve used for three years now: LR = light, enjoyable read; GR = good, several caveats; ER = excellent, few caveats; OR = outstanding; DNF = did not finish; NF=Non-Fiction; NMT = not my type. I’ve been told I’m a tough marker 🙂

Title Author My View Comment
Jan The Most Beautiful Woman in Florence (Washington Independent Review of Books) Alyssa Palombo NMT Disappointing – a novel of Sandro Botticelli and his muse Simonetta Vespucci
The Emperor’s Son (or Finding Napoleon) Margaret Rodenberg ER A beta read for a yet-to-be-published novel about Napoleon I
The Chaperone Laura Moriarty ER A middle-aged woman chaperones silent film star Louise Brooks
My Name is Lucy Barton Elizabeth Strout NMT Book club read – about the bond between a daughter and her mother
Feb The Promise of Provence Patricia Sands LR Post divorce, a woman finds the courage to begin again. Very enjoyable.
A Fearsome Doubt Charles Todd GR Post WWI murder mystery; quiet style
Where Dead Men Meet (reviewed for Historical Novel Society) Mark Mills ER Excellent murder mystery; a taut thriller set in 1937 Europe
Mar All the Stars in the Heavens Adriana Trigiani GR Book club; story about Loretta Young and Clark Gable – too long
Moonlight Over Paris Jennifer Robson LR A woman becomes an artist in post WWI Paris
The Saturday Evening Girls Club Jane Healey LR Four young immigrant women in early 1900s Boston
The Soldier, the Gaoler, the Spy and Her Lover Simon Parke GR English Civil War history and the execution of Charles I; link is to author’s guest post on the blog
My Promised Land Ari Shavit NF Superb non-fiction; if you want to understand the conundrum of Israel, read this
Apr Mr. Rochester

(reviewed for Washington Independent Review of Books)

Sarah Shoemaker ER An imaginative story from the point of view of Jane Eyre’s heroic Mr. Rochester
Dawn of the Belle Epoque Mary McAuliffe NF Reread for purposes of a future novel
Daughters of the Night Sky Aimie Runyan ER A compelling WWII story of bravery, determination, and love featuring Russia’s all female pilot regiment
May The Women in the Castle (link is to my review in Goodreads) Jessica Shawtuck ER Women in the aftermath of WWII and an attempt on Hitler’s life
The Photographer’s Wife Suzanne Joinson GR Set in 1920 and 1936 – Britain’s schemes in Israel; dual timeline creates confusion
High Tide Veronica Henry LR Light romance set in Cornwall
June The Weekenders Mary Kay Andrews LR Great beach read
The Danish Girl David Ebershoff ER Love the writing – the remarkable story of Lili Elbe, a pioneer in transgender history

I’ll cover the second half of 2017 next week.

FOR MORE ON READING & WRITING HISTORICAL FICTION follow A WRITER OF HISTORY (using the widget on the left sidebar)

M.K. Tod writes historical fiction. Her latest novel, TIME AND REGRET was published by Lake Union. Mary’s other novels, LIES TOLD IN SILENCE and UNRAVELLED are available from Amazon, NookKoboGoogle Play and iTunes. She can be contacted on Facebook, Twitter and Goodreads or on her website www.mktod.com.