Essex – Tudor Rebel by Tony Riches

Since his first novel, Owen – Book One of the Tudor Trilogy, Tony Riches has written many stories related to the Tudor dynasty. Of that novel, Tony said: “The idea for the Tudor Trilogy occurred to me when I realised Henry Tudor could be born in book one, ‘come of age’ in book two, and rule England in book three, so there would be plenty of scope to explore his life and times.”

Tony didn’t stop with one trilogy. He went on to write other novels featuring members of the Tudor family as well as novels featuring other historical times. His latest trilogy returns to the Tudor era – more specifically the reign of Elizabeth I and famous figures like Francis Drake, Walter Raleigh, and Robert Devereux, Earl of Essex. I’ve just finished reading Essex – Tudor Rebel and can tell you that it’s one of those wonderful novels that transports you in time and place.

And what a time it was! Wars, spies, palace intrigue, lovers, family feuds, conspiracies, and a monarch who capriciously alternates between approval and disapproval – the drama increases as Robert Devereux’s life unfolds. I highly recommend the story.

I asked Tony a few questions, beginning with why he’s fascinated with the Tudors.

Tony: I was born in Pembroke, South West Wales, a town dominated by the castle where Henry Tudor, who became King Henry VII, was born in 1457.

I began researching his life and realised I’d gathered enough material for three books, which would cover his birth, coming of age, and becoming King of England. I’m pleased to say the resulting Tudor trilogy has become an international best seller.

Henry’s youngest daughter, Mary Tudor, cared for him in his last months, and I became intrigued by the story of how her brother (Henry VIII) married her off to the aging King of France. I decided to write Mary’s story as a ‘sequel’, continuing the story of the Tudors, and this became the Brandon trilogy, after she married the king’s best friend, champion jouster Charles Brandon. The third book in the trilogy is about Charles Brandon’s fascinating last wife, Katherine Willoughby, which took me right up to the reign of Queen Elizabeth I.

Why these three men (Drake, Essex and Raleigh)?
 
I decided it would be fun to tell the story of the last Tudor through the eyes of her favourites. As a sailor myself, I’ve always been interested in Drake’s adventures, and I really enjoyed sailing around the world with him on the Golden Hind. (I was able to visit the impressive replica on the Thames in London, which gave me a real sense of what it must have been like.)
Replica of the Golden Hind

Drake worked his way up, against the odds, and had no time for arrogant nobles, so was appalled when Robert Devereux, the dashing young Earl of Essex, commandeers a warship from his fleet to sail in the ‘English Armada’ and attack Lisbon.

Francis Drake knew Queen Elizabeth had forbidden Essex to join the expedition – and he had no experience of naval command or fighting at sea. With typical bravado, Essex leapt from his ship into deep water, causing many of his followers to drown in their attempt to do the same. He then led the forty-mile march to Lisbon, without waiting for supplies, and many soldiers died from hunger, heat exhaustion and thirst. The whole enterprise proved a costly disaster, and set the tone for Robert’s later adventures.

I was intrigued to understand how the queen’s favourite got away with such behaviour, then turned against the queen with his ill-fated ‘rebellion’.  

Walter Raleigh was Robert Devereux’s rival for the attention of the queen, and was the obvious candidate for the third book, which I’m currently researching. I visited Raleigh’s cell at the Tower of London (where he was imprisoned three times!) and am looking for a new angle on his life. (Outside his cell is a herb garden, which was originally planted by Raleigh.)

What did you learn about Elizabeth I from your research?

Although her father tried to control the use of his image, Queen Elizabeth was ahead of her time with her strictly controlled branding as ‘Gloriana’. I found a troubled woman beneath  the thin veneer, who could be manipulative and vengeful. A skilled politician and diplomat, she managed her parliament and even the most ambitious men of her court. I’ve developed my research on Elizabeth into a series of three podcasts, which can be found here:

  • Queen Elizabeth Part I – the first of a series of three looking at the life of Queen Elizabeth the first, and is an introduction to the key events of Elizabeth’s life and challenging childhood
  • Queen Elizabeth Part II – the second podcast explores the myths and rumours surrounding the life of Queen Elizabeth I
  • Queen Elizabeth Part III – further explorations of Elizabeth I’s life

Many thanks, Tony. Wishing you all the best for Essex – Tudor Rebel. Other conversations with Tony Riches include:

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M.K. Tod writes historical fiction. Her latest novel, PARIS IN RUINS, is available for pre-order on Amazon USAmazon CanadaKobo, and Barnes&Noble. An earlier novel, TIME AND REGRET was published by Lake Union. Mary’s other novels, LIES TOLD IN SILENCE and UNRAVELLED are available from AmazonNookKoboGoogle Play and iTunes. She can be contacted on FacebookTwitter and Goodreads or on her website www.mktod.com.

Katherine – Tudor Duchess

If you think of the Tudors in terms of Henry VIII – think again. Tony Riches is a specialist in the history of the Wars of the Roses and the lives of the early Tudors. His other published historical fiction novels include: Owen – Book One Of The Tudor Trilogy, Jasper – Book Two Of The Tudor Trilogy, Henry – Book Three Of The Tudor Trilogy, Mary – Tudor Princess and Brandon – Tudor Knight. I’ve read several of Tony’s novels – they’re captivating with intriguing characters and a marvellous sense of time and place.

Tony Riches continues his passion for the Tudor dynasty with a new novel Katherine – Tudor Duchess, which is bound to be just as wonderful a read. Here’s the teaser:

Attractive, wealthy and influential, Katherine Willoughby is one of the most unusual ladies of the Tudor court. A favourite of King Henry VIII, Katherine knows all his six wives, his daughters Mary and Elizabeth, and his son Edward.

When her father dies, Katherine becomes the ward of Tudor knight, Sir Charles Brandon. Her Spanish mother, Maria de Salinas, is Queen Catherine of Aragon’s lady in waiting, so it is a challenging time for them when King Henry marries the enigmatic Anne Boleyn.

Following Anne’s dramatic downfall, Katherine marries Charles Brandon, and becomes Duchess of Suffolk at the age of fourteen. After the short reign of young Catherine Howard, and the death of Jane Seymour, Katherine and Brandon are chosen to welcome Anna of Cleves as she arrives in England.

When the royal marriage is annulled, Katherine’s good friend, Catherine Parr becomes the king’s sixth wife, and they work to promote religious reform. Katherine’s young sons are tutored with the future king, Prince Edward, and become his friends, but when Edward dies his Catholic sister Mary is crowned queen. Katherine’s Protestant faith puts her family in great danger – from which there seems no escape.

Katherine’s remarkable true story continues the epic tale of the rise of the Tudors, which began with the best-selling Tudor trilogy and concludes with the reign of Queen Elizabeth I. For more information about Tony’s books visit his website tonyriches.com and his blog, The Writing Desk or find him on  Facebook and Twitter @tonyriches. 

Katherine – Tudor Duchess is available in eBook and paperback from Amazon UK and Amazon US

You can read about Tony’s earlier novels Mary – Tudor Princess and Owen – Book One of the Tudor Trilogy.

FOR MORE ON READING & WRITING HISTORICAL FICTION  FOLLOW A WRITER OF HISTORY

M.K. Tod writes historical fiction. Her latest novel, TIME AND REGRET was published by Lake Union. Mary’s other novels, LIES TOLD IN SILENCE and UNRAVELLED are available from Amazon, NookKoboGoogle Play and iTunes. She can be contacted on Facebook, Twitter and Goodreads or on her website www.mktod.com.

Exploring Actual Locations for Historical Fiction with Tony Riches

Tony Riches has written a superb trilogy telling the stories of Owen (click here for an earlier post on Owen Tudor), Jasper, and Henry Tudor, King of England. He’s also been on the blog talking about writing a trilogy and the unique attributes of historical fiction. I’m delighted that he’s here today discussing his research process.

Exploring Actual Locations During Research for the Tudor Trilogy – by Tony Riches

When I set out to write the Tudor Trilogy I wanted to dig deeper and uncover new insights and details that would bring the early Tudors to life. For the first book, OWEN, I visited several locations including the beautiful island of Anglesey in North Wales, home of the first Tudors, as well as Pembroke Castle, where Owen spent his last years. (It helped that I was born in Pembroke, within sight of the castle, birthplace of Henry Tudor, and have now returned to live in West Wales.)

I had to piece together the details of Owen’s life by cross-checking different sources and ‘fill in the gaps’ from scarce records of the period. For the second book, JASPER, I continued his story in the third-person and was able to begin meaningful primary research, investigating events by visiting more actual locations.

There is only space here to provide a few examples, but one of the most interesting was when I investigated Jasper and the young Henry Tudor’s escape to exile. Pursued by the Yorkists, they had to flee for their lives through a secret tunnel to reach the harbour in the costal Welsh town of Tenby. Amazingly, the tunnel still exists, so I was able to gain access to see it for myself and walk in their footsteps deep under the streets.

Secret Tunnel Under Tenby

 

I was interested to see an ancient fireplace, littered with primitive glass bottles, and had a real sense of what it must have been like for the Tudors. I’ve sailed from the small harbour in Tenby many times, including at night, so have a good understanding of how they might have felt as they slipped away on the perilous voyage to Brittany.

I’d read that little happened during those fourteen years in exile – but of course Brittany was where Henry would come of age and begin to plan his return. Starting at the impressive palace of Duke Francis of Brittany in Vannes, I followed the Tudors to the Château de Suscinio on the coast. Luckily the château has been restored to look much as it might have when Jasper and Henry were there, and the surrounding countryside and coastline is largely unchanged.

Chateau de Suscinio in Brittany

Duke Francis of Brittany, began to worry when Yorkist agents began plotting to capture the Tudors, so he moved them to different fortresses further inland. I stayed by the river within sight of the magnificent Château de Josselin, were Jasper was effectively held prisoner. Although the inside has been updated over the years, the tower where Jasper lived survives and I was even able to identify Tudor period houses in the medieval town which he would have seen from his window.

Chateau de Josselin

Henry’s château was harder to find but worth the effort. The Forteresse de Largoët is deep in the forest outside of the town of Elven. His custodian, Marshall of Brittany, Jean IV, Lord of Rieux and Rochefort, had two sons of similar age to Henry and it is thought they continued their education together.

The Forteresse de Largoët

Entering the Dungeon Tower through a dark corridor, I regretted not bringing a torch, as the high stairway is lit only by the small window openings. Interestingly, the lower level is octagonal, with the second hexagonal and the rest square. Cautiously feeling my way up the staircase I was aware that, yet again, I walked in the footsteps of the young Henry Tudor, who would also have steadied himself by placing his hand against the cold stone walls, more than five centuries before.

When I returned to Wales I made the journey to remote Mill Bay, where Henry and Jasper landed with their small invasion fleet. A bronze plaque records the event and it was easy to imagine how they might have felt as they began the long march to confront King Richard at Bosworth. On the anniversary of the battle I walked across Bosworth field and watched hundreds of re-enactors recreate the battle, complete with cavalry and cannon fire.

Re-enactment of the Battle of Bosworth

The challenge I faced for the final book of the trilogy, HENRY, was too much information. Henry left a wealth of detailed records, often initialling every line in his ledgers, which still survive. At the same time, I had to deal with the contradictions, myths and legends that cloud interpretation of the facts. I decided the only way was to immerse myself in Henry’s world and explore events as they might have appeared from his point of view.

As I reached the end of Henry’s story I decided to visit his Tomb in Westminster Abbey. There is something quite surreal about making your way through Westminster Abbey. I stood on the spot where Henry was crowned and married before reaching his magnificent tomb in the Lady Chapel. His effigy is raised too high to see, so I climbed a convenient step and peered through the holes in the grille. There lay Henry with his wife, Elizabeth of York, their gilded hands clasped in prayer.

I’d like to think all this work and so many miles of travelling will help readers begin to understand the early Tudors – and see beyond the shallow ‘caricature’ of Henry as a miserly and soulless king. I’m pleased to say that all three books of the trilogy have become international best sellers, so I’d like to take this opportunity to thank all the readers around the world who have been on this journey with me.

As a wonderful postscript, on the 10th of June we are unveiling a life-sized bronze statue of Henry on the bridge outside Pembroke Castle, to ensure he is always remembered. Although this is the end of the Tudor trilogy, I am now researching the life of Henry’s daughter Mary and her adventurous husband Charles Brandon, so the story of the Tudors is far from over.

Many thanks for being on the blog, Tony, and for the support and encouragement you’ve given me. Wishing you great success with your latest novel.

Tony Riches is a full time author of best-selling fiction and non-fiction books. He lives by the sea in Pembrokeshire, West Wales with his wife and enjoys sailing and river kayaking in his spare time. For more information about Tony’s other books please visit his popular blog, The Writing Desk and website www.tonyriches.com and find him on Facebook and Twitter @tonyriches. The Tudor Trilogy is available on Amazon UK  Amazon US and Amazon AU.

FOR MORE ON READING & WRITING HISTORICAL FICTION follow A WRITER OF HISTORY (using the widget on the left sidebar)

M.K. Tod writes historical fiction and blogs about all aspects of the genre at A Writer of History. Her latest novel, TIME AND REGRET was published by Lake Union on August 16, 2016. Mary’s other novels, LIES TOLD IN SILENCE and UNRAVELLED are available from Amazon, NookKoboGoogle Play and iTunes. She can be contacted on Facebook, Twitter and Goodreads or on her website www.mktod.com.