Mapping Favourite Reading Sites

Last March I reported on favourite reading sites mentioned by those participating in the latest reader survey. How do these stack up against two dimensions of social reading: (1) the degree of socializing enabled and (2) the breadth of functionality provided?

Here’s my take on it. It’s interesting to me to see the proliferation in the bottom left quadrant. 

Please note that the position of each bubble is approximate as I wanted to make sure that you could read each one.

Social Reading & Reading Sites

 

Search sites – Bing and Google for example

Industry sites – Harper Collins was mentioned

Social media – Twitter and Facebook fit in this category

Traditional – online sites created by traditional media such as The Guardian

Author sites – Elizabeth Chadwick has a popular one

Book Blogs – hundreds mentioned by survey participants

Retailers – Amazon and others

Forums – example Historical Fiction Online

Fan Sites – Diana Gabaldon has several

Reading Sites – Goodreads is the biggest one (that’s why Amazon bought it)

Open to your feedback as always.

M.K. Tod writes historical fiction and blogs about all aspects of the genre at A Writer of History. Her latest novel, LIES TOLD IN SILENCE is set in WWI France and is available from Amazon, NookKoboGoogle Play and iTunes. Her debut novel, UNRAVELLED: Two wars. Two affairs. One marriage. is also available from these retailers.

Mary can be contacted on Facebook, Twitter and Goodreads.

 

Favourite reading oriented sites – Readers Choice

M.K. Tod’s 2013 historical fiction survey asked readers to name their “top 3 reading oriented websites, blogs and social media sites”. In other words, where do people go for information and discussion to enhance their reading. The answers are in:

2013 Favourite Online Reading SitesGoodreads is way out in front with 907 mentions followed by Facebook, Amazon, Twitter and Historical Novel Society.

Interestingly, when readers mention Facebook they often qualify their response by mentioning a favourite group, author, fan page or the Facebook page associated with a blog.

Compared with 2012, Twitter has leapt ahead and I am delighted to see the Historical Novel Society featured so strongly.

Over 675 sites were mentioned. That’s an amazing number of sources for readers to peruse!

CONGRATULATIONS TO ALL THE SITES FEATURED

When I have more time, I will attempt to aggregate some of the numbers so I can report on different categories such as small book review blogs, sites dedicated to historical fiction, author blogs, library sites and so on.

Ingredients of Favourite Historical Fiction – at Passages to the Past

Unravelled Blog TourPassages to the Past is the wonderful historical fiction blog of Amy Bruno. I first heard of Passages to the Past when it was chosen as one of the top four favourite blog sites by participants of my 2012 reader survey. Since then, Amy and I have corresponded back and forth, however, this is the first time we’ve coordinated a post and I am truly delighted to be on her site.

The topic is Ingredients of Favourite Historical Fiction. Here’s the first few sentences.

“The 2012 survey I conducted showed that the top three reasons people read historical fiction are to bring the past to life, to enjoy a great story and to understand and learn. But what is the magic formula that makes the very best historical fiction stand out?…”

Amy is also offering a giveaway.