Paris – Fuel for a Story

It was a no-brainer to set my next novel in Paris, a city so rich with culture, history, beauty, tradition, and flare. With a rough outline of the plot already written, I was looking for those je-ne-sais-quoi details to add an extra spark of interest or to twist the plot another notch. What have I found?

More work to be done and the brain is churning.

A door knocker that definitely needs to feature somewhere.
A door knocker that definitely needs to feature somewhere.

 

 

A picture of a Paris fort during the siege
A picture of a Paris fort during the siege
A woman who delivered drinks to soldiers during battle
A woman who delivered drinks to soldiers during battle
A confessional at Eglise Saint Thomas D'Aquin
A confessional at Eglise Saint Thomas D’Aquin

 

A crinoline frame to keep a woman's dress wide and full.
A crinoline frame to keep a woman’s dress wide and full.

 

A little park near Hotel des Invalides.
A little park near Hotel des Invalides.
A replica of a fan shop that existed in the 19th century
A replica of a fan shop that existed in the 19th century

 

along with a tea shop established in 1854.
along with a tea shop established in 1854.

 

13 thoughts on “Paris – Fuel for a Story”

    1. The info from the museum did not state the materials, although I’ve seen reference to steel, horsehair, whalebone and cane (doesn’t that sound comfortable?). Here’s what the info card said: “The taste for the 19th century during the Second Empire was expressed through the crinoline as an interpretation of the pannier. From 1845, robes a transformation appeared comprising at least two bodices that could be changed according to the occasion – generally there was one for the day and one for the evening. Initially round, it [the crinoline] began projecting its mass towards the back as of 1861. From 1867, it once again became a more modest conical form.”

  1. What an interesting idea for a blog post to intrigue readers into the story you’re writing. Already I’m intrigued by that woman who might be dressed as a soldier and that little garden so close to the hotel.

    1. Well then … there’s my story! All I need to do is change the characters a wee bit and we’re all set 🙂 Thanks for your comment, Sophie. Hope your writing is going well.

  2. I’m writing an Historical Fiction book “LaRose Land” based on my mother’s family history. Setting of story is late 1580’s -1606 in Limoges, France. Research plays a big part of the story setting and a whole of imagination to create the story line.

  3. I too am intrigued by the uniform worn by women working in, and around, the battefiled to help support the soldiers…I wonder what else they did, and if this was the siuation in other battles?

    So interesting:)

    1. I imagine there could be a book to come from this tidbit. Apparently the cantinieres were always married to soldiers and if their husband died they had to give up the role. They began in Napoleon I’s army and made money by selling mainly food and drink to the soldiers (did not have a salary).

    1. Many thanks, Sharon. Now that I’ve done some more research, the outline is almost complete so I need to get down to writing! Then editing and so on. In the meantime, I have a third novel coming out at the end of summer – it’s called Time and Regret and will be published by Lake Union. Perhaps you’ll enjoy that!

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